Rewards Network - Original Design 

This iteration of the company's website is a great example of what happens when a website is designed without a UX team or process in place. Quite simply, it lacked focus. There were way too many elements competing for the user's attention throughout the page without any clear informational hierarchy or defined paths to behavior. Above the fold alone (slide one above), there were two right facing arrows, one down facing arrow, a play button and a "watch now" arrow. And this is in addition to three paragraphs of text and two different faces competing for your visual attention! 

Ironically, this "we've got to show/tell them everything!!" approach to web design often ends producing the exact opposite effect. Too much stimuli on a page overwhelms users and reduces cognitive ability, which causes them to simply tune out and not read anything. And, of course, there's that famous jam study that proved that more choice actually decreases sales conversions

You can see the revisions I made to increase usability and optimize conversions for this client on my original prototype or feel free to check out the final product here.  


GüdTea - Original Design 

This was a perfect example of a site that started with good visual elements, but lacked any strategy when it came to designing for the intended user behavior of the site - which was to sell tea. As you can see above, there was not one direct navigation item, link or call to action button on the homepage in which a user would be able to actually buy the product! 

Below, you see the revisions I made intended to increase usability and optimize sales conversions on each page...

GüdTea - Revised Version 

Revisions included a direct "buy now" link in the main navigation, a value proposition/slogan added to the hero image, call to action buttons in key spots on every page and increased legibility on headers and body text. I also encouraged the client to add his picture and more personal narrative to the About Us page as a way to build trust with the user. 

The Need for UX
 

I often get contacted by clients who have recently had a website built for them, but there's a certain je ne sais quois that's just not there.  

What's missing is typically that whoever built the site didn't take user experience (UX) into consideration. Understanding user behavior patterns and placing navigation elements in the right spots is the key to optimizing websites for increased user engagement and sales conversions. 

Have a site you'd like optimized? Drop me a line and we can discuss an affordable solution tailored to fit your business needs.